25 Best Careers of 2016

25 Best Careers of 2016

Glassdoor release its top 25 Best Career list, which, they say:

have the highest overall Glassdoor Job Score, determined by combining three key factors – number of job openings, salary and career opportunities rating.

According to Glassdoor, the ranking for 2016 are:

1. Data scientist

 

• Job Score: 4.7
• Number of Job Openings: 1,736.
• Median Base Salary: $116,840
• Career Opportunities Rating: 4.1

2. Tax Manager

 

• Job Score: 4.7
• Number of Job Openings: 1,574
• Median Base Salary: $108,000
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.9

3. Solutions Architect

• Job Score: 4.6
• Number of Job Openings: 2,906
• Median Base Salary: $119,500
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.5

4. Engagement Manager

• Job Score: 4.6
• Number of Job Openings: 1,356
• Median Base Salary: $125,000
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.8

5. Mobile Developer

 

• Job Score: 4.6
• Number of Job Openings: 2,251
• Median Base Salary: $90,000
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.8

6. HR Manager

• Job Score: 4.6
• Number of Job Openings: 3,468
• Median Base Salary: $85,000
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.7

7. Physician Assistant

 

• Job Score: 4.6
• Number of Job Openings: 3,364
• Median Base Salary: $97,000
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.5

8. Product Manager

• Job Score: 4.5
• Number of Job Openings: 6,607
• Median Base Salary: $106,680
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.3

9. Software Engineer

• Job Score: 4.5
• Number of Job Openings: 49,270
• Median Base Salary: $95,000
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.3

10. Audit Manager

• Job Score: 4.5
• Number of Job Openings: 1,001
• Median Base Salary: $95,000
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.9

 

11. Analytics Manager

• Job Score: 4.5
• Number of Job Openings: 982
• Median Base Salary: $105,000
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.7

12. Software Development Manager

• Job Score: 4.4

• Number of Job Openings: 1,199
• Median Base Salary: $135,000
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.4

 

13. Product Marketing Manager

• Job Score: 4.4
• Number of Job Openings: 1,111
• Median Base Salary: $115,000
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.5

14. Marketing Manager

 

• Job Score: 4.4
• Number of Job Openings: 2,560
• Median Base Salary: $90,000
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.4

15. QA Manager

• Job Score: 4.4
• Number of Job Openings: 3,749
• Median Base Salary: $85,000
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.4

16. Finance Manager

• Job Score: 4.3
• Number of Job Openings: 1,632
• Median Base Salary: $115,000
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.3

17. Business Development Manager

 

• Job Score: 4.3
• Number of Job Openings: 2,906
• Median Base Salary: $80,000
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.4

18. UX Designer

• Job Score: 4.3
• Number of Job Openings: 863
• Median Base Salary: $91,800
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.6

19. Strategy Manager

• Job Score: 4.3
• Number of Job Openings: 631
• Median Base Salary: $130,000
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.7

20. Technical Account Manager

 

• Job Score: 4.2
• Number of Job Openings: 1,160
• Median Base Salary: $69,548
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.7

21. Consultant

• Job Score: 4.2
• Number of Job Openings: 1,071
• Median Base Salary: $84,000
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.4

22. Construction Superintendent

 

• Job Score: 4.2
• Number of Job Openings: 1,054
• Median Base Salary: $78,000
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.4

23. Nurse Practitioner

• Job Score: 4.2
• Number of Job Openings: 5,624
• Median Base Salary: $99,500
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.1

24. Electrical Engineer

• Career Score: 4.2
• Number of Job Openings: 2,516
• Median Base Salary: $76,900
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.3

25. Software Architect

• Career Score: 4.2
• Number of Job Openings: 653
• Median Base Salary: $130,000
• Career Opportunities Rating: 3.4

Wondering about the methodology and what the rankings mean? 

Glassdoor’s 25 Best Jobs in America report identifies specific jobs with the highest overall Glassdoor Job Score. The Glassdoor Job Score is determined by weighting three factors equally: earning potential (median annual base salary), career opportunities rating, and number of job openings. Results represent job titles that rate highly among all three categories. The Glassdoor Job Score is based on a 5-point scale (5.0=best job, 1.0=bad job). For a job title to be considered, it must receive at least 75 salary reports and at least 75 career opportunities ratings shared by U.S.-based employees over the past year (1/8/15-1/7/16). The number of job openings per job title represents active job listings on Glassdoor as of 1/8/16. This report takes into account job title normalization that groups similar job titles.

How to Not Break Your Career On Your Leave Of Absence

How to Not Break Your Career On Your Leave Of Absence

A leave of absence doesn’t need to mean that you are dooming your career. We’ll give you solid insights on how you can make sure you keep your career on track; and take care of yourself and you family.

For most of your working life, you’ll probably juggle your responsibilities at home and the office, but sometimes personal issues demand your full attention. Maybe you’re expecting twins or undergoing major surgery. Maybe you’re joining the army or going back to school temporarily.

A leave of absence can be the ideal solution for such major life events. However, it’s important to take precautions so you’ll be able to resume your career when things settle down.

After all, life is full of uncertainties. One day you’re paying for monthly parking, and the next you could be considering taking an extended break from your job. Use these ideas for taking time off without sacrificing future opportunities.

Planning Your Leave of Absence

Save money. Unless you’re on disability, you probably won’t receive any pay while you’re away from work. Build up your cash reserves in advance. Reduce your housing expenses if possible. Cook at home instead of dining out.

Research your rights. You may be legally entitled to some forms of leave, especially if you’re covered by the Family and Medical Leave Act that allows up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave each year if you or your immediate family have a serious health condition or you’re having a baby. Check your employee manual or speak with your HR department, or consult with a lawyer to understand your legal rights.

Weigh the consequences. Clarify what level of job protection you’re provided. With mandated leave, there’s usually a guarantee you’ll be reinstated. With voluntary leave, you could be terminated if there’s no suitable opening available when you return.

Cover your responsibilities. Assure your boss that you care about your job. Present proposals for how to cover your tasks while you’re out.

Give prompt notice. Let your employer know about your plans as soon as possible. Cooperating on a smooth transition will help everyone to adapt to the changes.

Taking Your Leave of Absence

  1. Provide updates. Keep your boss in the loop. Tell them about any developments in your medical condition or other circumstances that would affect your return to work.
  2. Remain accessible. Of course, your situation will impact your co-workers as well as your boss. If you’re able to stay in touch, give a trusted team member your contact information so you can answer questions as they come up.

Stay active. Look for ways to minimize gaps on your resume. If your condition allows, do volunteer work or take on consulting assignments. Join a committee at your professional association.

Protect your health. For some workers, staying home can be more stressful than keeping up their usual 9 to 5 routine. Pay extra attention to eating a balanced diet, exercising daily, and sleeping well. Spend time with family and friends.

Returning From Your Leave of Absence

  1. Contact your employer. Thank your employer for accommodating you and let them know that you’re eager to be back on the job. Discuss what would be the most productive way for you to catch up.
  2. Modify your job. In some cases, you may need to make a phased return to work. Ask your employer about altering your hours or responsibilities or adapting your workspace.

Negotiate offers. What about job hunting after a leave of absence if you decide to move on or your employer needs to terminate you because there’s no immediate openings? Find out what salary range is appropriate for your skills, and rehearse a brief explanation of the situation that you can deliver with confidence when you go on interviews.

Preparing for emergencies gives you peace of mind and more control over your future. Collaborate with your employer so you can maintain your professionalism while taking off the time you need for personal obligations.

6 Ways to Get Control In Your Life and Career

6 Ways to Get Control In Your Life and Career

Have you ever felt like you’re just out of balance, getting moved along a path in your career, but you are behind the controls of the destination. I hear this a lot – careers out of control with demanding jobs spilling over into chaos in all areas of your life. This imbalance is often caused by putting undue focus on certain priorities to an extent that pushes out your other priorities. A life that’s under control is also well-balanced.

Regain your balance and get back at the helm of a life you desire with these strategies:

1. Tackle your possessions. It’s easy to get your life out of balance if you’ve been overly focused on possessions. You’re more likely to incur debt. You also might be feeling empty inside. The rush of owning a Ferrari eventually wear off. Avoid chasing possessions as a source of happiness.

  • By the same token, if you don’t have the possessions you require, life is also unbalanced. Reliable transportation, suitable clothing, and a phone are a few possessions that are worth having.
  • Avoid letting possessions control your life, but ensure that you have what you need.
  • If debt is an issue, find a resource to help you understand your debt issues (do you lack income, or overspend?), make a budget that supports a healthy life goals and debt reduction overtime.

2. Your appearance and health. Focusing on your health is a worthwhile use of your attention. But too many people are overly concerned with their appearance. Everyone that lives long enough eventually looks old. What will you do then?

  • You still have the option of feeling good about yourself, even if you’re not as attractive by the stereotypical standards as some people are. Everyone has their own unique beauty.
  • Paying attention to your health and accepting your appearance will put this aspect of your life into balance.

3. Finances. Many people tie their self-image to their income. This isn’t a healthy or well-balanced approach. Money and happiness also don’t correlate above an income of $75k. Avoid basing your self-esteem on how much money you make.

  • Having too little money can also throw your life out of balance. If you don’t have enough money to reliably pay your bills and feed your family, there’s going to be stress. Focus on generating the income you need, but avoid giving money more attention than it deserves.
  • Are you looking for ways to generate extra income? Take a look at the skills you have – there is almost always some availability for part-time gig-type work from delivering pizza’s, to digital economy gigs on platforms like Fiverr or Upwork. What about selling off things on Ebay? Crafting or collecting on Etsy? Don’t overlook simple solutions that might not be valuable to you, but could generate an influx of needed cash.

4. Relationships. Relationships are important, but they’re not the only thing in life. Putting all your emphasis on a relationship can limit other aspects of your life.

  • Relationships can be a significant source of both pleasure and stress. If your life is feeling out of control, take a look at your relationships and determine if they are positive and rewarding or negative and demanding or worse, destructive or harmful. 

5. Career. This tends to affect men more than women. Men seem to define themselves by their careers. How many times have you been asked, “What do you do?” And we’d love to say we’re a cardiothoracic surgeon instead of a plumber. But why does it matter?

  • Give work enough priority that you’re able to be successful in your chosen field, and remember that you’re more than your job title.

6. Reputation. Once we start school, we’re obsessed with the opinions of others. Carrying this attitude into adulthood can create challenges.

  • Let go of the need to be admired by everyone. If your friends and family admire you, you’re doing better than most.

It’s all about balance. Try to find the middle path. We all need money, but no one needs $10 million. It’s not having $10 million that’s the problem. It’s the unreasonable pursuit of it. Find balance in your work, relationships, and possessions. Get your life back under control by seeking balance.

Return to Work Mom Secret: Showcase Volunteer Experience On Resume

Return to Work Mom Secret: Showcase Volunteer Experience On Resume

You’ve just spent the last few years doing the most important, hardest job on earth. You are a Mom. You made a bold choice to stay at home with your precious wee-ones.

Now you’re wondering about getting back to work, but you’re worried that your resume and interview repertoire needs a brush-up.

Hire-The-Right-Talent-Return-to-Work-Mom-Secret

Thinking about a career change?

Want to just earn a little extra money?

Reach deep to uncover the many, many skills you’ve kept current through your work volunteering in your community and you can land the position of your dreams.

 

Whatever your situation, you may find yourself wanting to showcase some your non-paid work experiences. How do you measure and capture your non-work experience?

Awesome Volunteer Experiences to Convert On Your Resume

  • If you’ve ever led an organized group for children, you have non-paid experience under your belt. Being a Cub Scout Leader, Girl Scout Leader, or Boy Scout Leader involves numerous skills and talents. More about that later.
  • Volunteer stints certainly count. If you’ve ever been a volunteer, you know the dedication, skill and work it requires.
  • Being a member of your local school’s Parent-Teacher Organization (PTO) can be considered non-paid work experience.
  • Serving on community committees would certainly count.
  • Perhaps you’ve done a lot of babysitting over the years for neighbors, friends and family members. Babysitting requires many skills that can be showcased on a resume or in an interview.

Highlight Your Skills and Experiences

Determining the skills used and the tasks completed for each non-paid work experience takes a little time. Let’s consider the above-listed examples and review sample skills and duties for each.

1. For Scout Leader or similar “leader” positions of organized children’s groups, what duties did you perform? How could you phrase them so that they’re relevant to a work environment?

  • Responsible for management of weekly meetings.
  • Performed scheduling duties: Set schedules for when, where and how long to meet
  • Utilized planning skills to plan weekly, monthly, or yearly activities.
  • Demonstrated organization skills: Gathered necessary supplies, made appropriate purchase orders and selected materials.
  • Budget design and management.
  • Prepared reports for the local organization that oversees the group.

2. When you volunteer, skills and experiences will vary depending on the type of volunteer work performed. For the sake of illustration, let’s assume you did volunteer work for a local social service organization.

  • Consistently reported for duties on time and ready to work.
  • Performed sorting and delivery of daily mail 2 days per week.
  • Planned and carried out mass mailings of program materials.
  • Provided unpaid staff leadership in the supervisor’s absence.
  • Designed and wrote monthly program newsletter.

3. As a member of a PTO, you might have performed a variety of duties that can be showcased on your resume as non-paid work experience.

  • Acted as Committee Chair for Fundraising Events.
  • Planned and coordinated fundraising events for the school.
  • Served as Co-Chair of Meet and Greet Committee.
  • Developed activities to encourage more parents to join PTO.
  • Responsible for increasing PTO membership by 3% per year over 3-year involvement.

4. For this example, you served as a volunteer in the fictitious Welcome to Our Town group. The following duties could be noted on your resume as non-paid work experience:

  • Developed marketing flyers for the town.
  • Coordinated meetings of Welcome to Our Town staff.
  • Supervised volunteer staff of 4. Supervising volunteers can be a weighty asset; most hiring managers know how challenging it can be to manage people who aren’t being paid.
  • Responsible for setting up exhibits and providing information about the town at local publicity events.
  • Conducted phone interviews with new community members.

5. Being a babysitter involves several skills and duties and a lot of responsibility.

  • Provided childcare to 4 children, ages 2 to 4, Monday through Friday, over a 2-year span.
  • Planned, organized and conducted field trips and tours to local museums and parks for the children.
  • Kept documentation on each child to share with parents regarding the child’s behavior and activities throughout the day.

As a returning to work mom, the biggest hurdle you are likely going to face is putting your own value on the work you’ve performed through your time out-of-the- workforce.

As a Mom returning to work, define your value.

Get Set, What’s Next

To get started, make a list now of your unpaid work experience, compiling the position and approximate month and year you started and ended each role. Use some of the ideas above as examples to make your list of skills necessary for each experience and the duties you performed. Now you can showcase your non-paid work experiences on your resume to help you attain your back-to-work career goals.